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Technologies Reinventing Global Manufacturing

Are new technologies in the global manufacturing industry driving the next industrial revolution? The answer to this question will be on full display and central to many of the topics discussed at two big global manufacturing events taking place this week: M2M World Congress 2015 in London and Smart Manufacturing Summit in Indianapolis, USA.

Core to both event agendas, how manufacturing is being reinvented for the 21st century.  New technologies and movements such as additive printing, the Industrial Internet, the Internet of Things and M2M remote monitoring means new global expansion and new ways of doing business for industrial manufacturers around the world.  These along with the way we share information today via the cloud, mobile, wearables means languages, translation and localization play an important role for these innovations to take full effect.

As an example, manufacturing companies do face challenges in the areas of technological skills gap. Recruiting and training is global. The impact on the supply chain plus changing world economics means many manufacturers are having to face re-shoring production activities to make the books balance. In addition to training materials, translation of technical documentation and content must be localized when operating a multinational supply chain.

In this blog, I want to look at these key technologies that are changing the face of manufacturing, possibly driving a new industrial revolution and consider the impact on globalization.

3D or additive printing is the process of making a 3D solid object of virtually any shape from a digital model. “Manufacturing on demand” is now a production reality. Gartner analysts said worldwide 3D printer shipments are set to double, year-over-year. Advances in additive manufacturing technology indicate a growth in small, local production units, providing on-demand 3D printing which means increased demand for localization of user manuals and training materials. Manufacturing-heavy sectors, like energy, oil and gas, are seeing an increased use of additive production methods, leading to more specialist requirements in the translation of technical communications.

The Internet of Things (IoT) is a well-known, heavily used media term used to apply to a system where microprocessors are in everyday items – cars, credit cards, domestic white goods (see: The Internet of Things and How it Affects Localization). From a localization perspective, the IoT has significant implication and opportunity. For example, more communications will exist on smaller screens, smart devices and rely more heavily on imaging and iconography – all of which have to be localized for local markets.

Machine to Machine (M2M) refers to technologies that allow both wireless and wired systems to communicate with other devices of the same type and is an important part of the overall IoT movement and enables the Industrial Internet.  M2M uses a device, such as a sensor, to capture an event like temperature or inventory levels, which is then relayed through a network to an application that translates the event into meaningful information. This meaningful information, relayed to an internet-connected IT infrastructure, must be understood by other machines and ultimately, humans.

Although the language between machines is universal, we don’t all speak the same language therefore information must be localized for the intended audience. As production sites shift, seeking lower cost alternatives or to a more local unit for on-demand 3D printing, each locale and every user and workforce must be considered.

For global manufacturers, translation and localization of data and information is crucial for all content types, including user interfaces, training materials, technical manuals, software localization and internationalization. All this content has to be localized by specialists, experienced translators and language service providers that are experts in working with global manufacturing leaders.

All these interconnected innovations – the IoT, 3D printing, M2M, the Industrial Internet – are all technologies that are driving the global economy towards a connected world with intelligent machines and processes. They will have a big impact on manufacturing supply chains and the skills required by the manufacturing workforce. We know universal computer codes and languages exist and can smoothly communicate with each other. However, even in this climate of innovation and change, one fact that remains is that humans will always speak different languages and will ultimately be managing and operating this intelligent machinery.

Even if machines become super-intelligent, global communications will be still fundamentally driven by people and not machines.

Louise

Louse.law@welocalize.com

Louise Law is Global Communications Manager at Welocalize.

For more information on Welocalize services in the manufacturing sector, click here.

welocalize ranked number 406 fastest growing company in north america on deloitte’s 2012 technology fast 500™

Frederick, MD USA – November 14th, 2012 Welocalize today announced that it ranked number 406 on Technology Fast 500™, Deloitte’s ranking of 500 of the fastest growing technology, media, telecommunications, life sciences and clean technology companies in North America. Rankings are based on percentage of fiscal year revenue growth during the period from 2006 – 2011. Welocalize grew 181% during this period.

Welocalize’s CEO, Smith Yewell commented on the ranking. “Welocalize did it again. Only this year, we did it better – our revenue growth is higher and we’ve moved up 32 places from last year’s ranking. As always, credit due to our hard-working and focused, global workforce. It’s still a tough economic climate out there and we know our localization and translation services have to be delivered as efficiently as possible to meet the ever-growing needs of our clients,” said Smith Yewell. “Our focus on Operational Excellence to drive out waste and add value is creating impact in the industry and delighting our clients.”

“We are proud to honor the 2012 Technology Fast 500™ companies, and commend them for their outstanding growth,” said Eric Openshaw, vice chairman, Deloitte LLP and US technology, media and telecommunications (TMT) leader. “These ground-breaking companies have outpaced their competition and are reinventing the way we do business today.”

Welocalize previously ranked 438 in 2011 – The Company has received the Technology Fast 500™ award for the past 12 years

About Deloitte’s 2012 Technology Fast 500

Technology Fast 500, conducted by Deloitte & Touche LLP, provides a ranking of the fastest growing technology, media, telecommunications, life sciences and clean technology companies – both public and private – in North America. Technology Fast 500 award winners are selected based on percentage fiscal year revenue growth from 2007 to 2011.

In order to be eligible for Technology Fast 500 recognition, companies must own proprietary intellectual property or technology that is sold to customers in products that contribute to a majority of the company’s operating revenues. Companies must have base-year operating revenues of at least $50,000 USD or CD, and current-year operating revenues of at least $5 million USD or CD. Additionally, companies must be in business for a minimum of five years, and be headquartered within North America.

About Welocalize

Welocalize offers integrated translation services and products to support the need for on-demand translation. We provide globalization consulting, translation, localization, testing solutions, and enterprise translation management tools that are optimized to be able to deliver on-demand translation in over 120 languages. With over 600 employees worldwide, Welocalize maintains offices in the United States, UK, Germany, Ireland, Japan and China. Please visit www.welocalize.com for more information.